New Immunotherapy AXAL Shows Positive Results For Cervical Cancer Patients

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact:
Elizabeth Edwards
Communications Coordinator
Society of Gynecologic Oncology
Foundation for Women’s Cancer
Cell Phone: (618) 795-4824
Office Phone: (312) 676-3911

New Immunotherapy AXAL shows positive results for cervical cancer patients

National Harbor, MD (March 14, 2017) – A new immunotherapy drug, AXAL, showed better survival rates for cervical cancer patients, according to a study, presented at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology 2017 Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer.

Study co-author Charles Leath, MD, MSPH, an SGO member from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said that 50 patients with recurrent cervical cancer where given the immunotherapy, AXAL (axalimogene filoslisbac), as a single agent during a phase 2 clinical trial. In general, an immunotherapy helps the native immune system work in both the recognition of cancer cells as foreign and hopefully with the eradication of those same cancer cells.

“At one year, nearly 40 percent of treated patients were alive, and in this group of patients, this is meaningful,” Dr. Leath said. Typically, this population of patients only have about 24 percent survival rate at one year.

“The big picture is we now have a treatment that has made it all the way through a phase II trial that appears to have activity for treating recurrent cervical cancer. Because of this activity we have an obligation to evaluate AXAL further to see how else this may help patients with cervical cancer.”

Historically, Dr. Leath said that many of the evaluated therapies for recurrent cervical cancer have proven ineffective in the clinical trial process. The next steps for the drug is to test AXAL in a population of patients newly diagnosed with cervical cancer.

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The Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) is a 501(c) (6) national medical specialty organization of physicians and allied health care professionals who are trained in the comprehensive management of women with malignancies of the reproductive tract. Visit the SGO website, to learn more at https://www.sgo.org/.