SGO Issues Oct 20, 2016

sgo-issues

SGO Issues Oct. 20, 2016

Nominations for 2017-2018 SGO Board open through Nov. 10
CDC recommends only two HPV shots for younger adolescents
Survivors Course during Race to End Women’s Cancer weekend
CMS taking steps to reduce medical review for certain APMs
White House releases recommendations for Cancer Moonshot

Nominations for 2017-2018 SGO Board open through Nov. 10

SGO’s Nominating Committee is accepting applications for the following open positions:

  • President Elect II (one-year term; total time commitment of four years)
  • Three Board member positions (three-year term)
  • Candidate Representative (one-year term)
  • Fellow-in-Training (FIT) Representative (one-year term)

If you are interested in serving, please review the board service and election FAQs and complete the self-nomination form. The deadline to apply is Thursday, Nov. 10. Any questions can be directed to SGO’s Manager of Governance, Jennifer Ocampo-Martinez, at (312) 676-3916 or jennifer.ocampo@sgo.org.

CDC recommends only two HPV shots for younger adolescents

hpv-vax-screen-shotYesterday the CDC recommended that 11- to 12-year-olds receive two doses of HPV vaccine at least six months apart rather than the previously recommended three doses to protect against cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. The CDC noted that this recommendation makes it easier for parents to protect their children by reducing the number of shots and trips to the doctor. Teens and young adults who start the series later, at ages 15 through 26 years, will continue to need three doses of HPV vaccine to protect against cancer-causing HPV infection.

According to the official CDC press release, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted to recommend a 2-dose HPV vaccine schedule for young adolescents. The CDC and ACIP reviewed data from clinical trials showing two doses of HPV vaccine in younger adolescents (aged 9-14 years) produced an immune response similar or higher than the response in young adults (aged 16-26 years) who received three doses.

Generally, preteens receive HPV vaccine at the same time as whooping cough and meningitis vaccines. Two doses of HPV vaccine given at least six months apart at ages 11 and 12 years will provide safe, effective, and long-lasting protection against HPV cancers. Adolescents ages 13-14 are also able to receive HPV vaccination on the new 2-dose schedule.

CDC will provide guidance to parents, healthcare professionals, and insurers on the change in recommendation. On Oct. 7, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved adding a 2-dose schedule for 9-valent HPV vaccine (Gardasil® 9) for adolescents ages 9 through 14 years. CDC encourages clinicians to begin implementing the 2-dose schedule in their practice to protect their preteen patients from HPV cancers.

Survivors Course during Race to End Women’s Cancer weekend

20151108-img_8725Registration is open for the Foundation for Women’s Cancer (FWC) Ovarian Cancer Survivors Course at the JW Marriott Hotel Washington, DC, 1333 Pennsylvania Ave. on Saturday, Nov. 5, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The course will be co-moderated by David Mutch, MD, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO, and Monica Jones, MD, of Duke Health in Raleigh, NC. It is open to all cancer survivors, loved ones, caretakers and friends who are in Washington for the National Race to End Women’s Cancer on Freedom Plaza on Nov. 6.

CMS taking steps to reduce medical review for certain APMs

On Oct. 17, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a new initiative to improve the clinician experience with the Medicare program. As they implement delivery system reforms from the Affordable Care Act and the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), this long-term effort aims to reshape the physician experience by reviewing regulations and policies to minimize administrative tasks and seek other input to improve clinician satisfaction.

To ensure CMS is hearing from physicians on the ground, each of the ten CMS regional offices will oversee local meetings to take input from physician practices within the next six months and regular meetings thereafter. These local meetings will result in a report with targeted recommendations to the CMS Administrator in 2017.

The first action is the launch of an 18-month pilot program to reduce medical review for certain physicians while continuing to protect program integrity. Under the program, providers practicing within specified Advanced Alternative Payment Models (APMs) will be relieved of some scrutiny under certain medical review programs.

Advanced APMs were identified as a potential opportunity for this pilot because participating clinicians share financial risk with the Medicare program. After the results of the pilot are analyzed, CMS will consider expansion along various dimensions including additional Advanced APMs, specialties, and provider types.

White House releases recommendations for Cancer Moonshot

On Oct. 17, the White House released the report of the Cancer Moonshot Task Force.  The report consists of a detailed set of findings and recommendations to accelerate researchers’ understanding of cancer and its prevention, early detection, and treatment. As part of this report, Vice President Joe Biden also unveiled a new set of federal, private sector and joint public–private actions to advance the goals of the Cancer Moonshot Task Force, which incorporate some of the suggestions put forth by SGO earlier this year and may directly impact gynecologic cancers.

These goals include:

Promoting Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination as Cancer Prevention – Under the Cancer Moonshot, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advancing its efforts to promote cancer vaccines as a safe and effective strategy for combatting various types of cancers. As part of this effort, in September CDC renewed its commitment to the National HPV Vaccination Roundtable for an additional five years, which will include increased state level support for this effort. The Roundtable, managed by the American Cancer Society, is tasked with bringing together immunization and cancer prevention stakeholders to provide education, outreach, and training to the public and to health care providers. The National HPV Vaccination Roundtable will be working to increase HPV vaccination rates by decreasing missed opportunities, raising awareness about the importance of vaccinating males and females ages 11-12, and maximizing access to and opportunities for vaccination.

Strengthening and Clarifying the Requirements for Public Availability of Clinical Trial Information – In September, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a final rule for clinical trial registration and results information submission to ClinicalTrials.gov, a database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world, to increase the availability of information about ongoing clinical trials and summary results. NIH and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also announced a series of efforts and policies accompanying the rule to improve the quality and efficiency of clinical research, including activities focused on helping people find trials, enhancing clinical trial design, and increasing the efficiency of the drug and device development process. Ultimately these efforts will help prevent the unnecessary duplication of unsuccessful or unsafe trials, increase the efficiency of drug and device development processes, improve clinical research practice, and build public trust in clinical research.

The task force report and related announcements are available online. Douglas Lowy, MD, Acting Director of the National Cancer Institute, has formally delivered the final report of the Blue Ribbon Panel to Vice President Biden. A copy of his cover letter is available and the full report is on the National Cancer Institute website.