SGO Issues Oct 23, 2014

sgo-issues

SGO Issues October 23, 2014

SGO Clinical Outcomes Registry accepting new participants
Revised SGO genetics statements approved
Research grant applications due Nov. 21
NCI scientists awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation
Transitioning to ICD-10 National Provider Call Nov. 5

SGO Clinical Outcomes Registry accepting new participants

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SGO Clinical Outcomes Registry (SGO COR) is a new tool to allow members to collect outcomes data and participate in quality initiatives. In January the Registry will be ready to accept new participants. Please take the time to become familiar with the Patient Data Collection Forms for ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer. Cervical cancer forms will be available by early 2015. To participate in the Registry, institutions and/or physician practices must complete the Participation Agreement and Business Associate Agreement and Data Use Agreement. Other useful information, including a participation guide, is available here.

Upon full execution of the legal agreements required to participate in the SGO COR, participants will receive a profile form to input demographic information, such as institution type, population served, number of cases annually per disease and number of gynecologic oncologists. After the profile form has been completed the site will be set up within SGO COR and accounts will be assigned for access to the system. Data collection may then begin.

SGO COR has undergone extensive alpha and beta testing over the past year and has almost 750 patient records to date. “In addition to providing benchmarking and opportunities to SGO members for quality improvement, the registry will be used to test our newly developed quality measures in ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer, and provide support for their inclusion in PQRS,” said Sean C. Dowdy, MD, FACS, Vice Chair of the SGO Quality & Outcomes Committee.

“This is an amazing tool that’s going to benefit gynecologic oncologists, our Society, and hopefully women’s health care throughout the United States,” said Ed Grendys, MD, FACOG, FACS, a member of the Quality & Outcomes Committee who performed beta testing of SGO COR at Florida Gynecologic Oncology in Fort Myers.

Dr. Grendys noted that the SGO Quality & Outcomes Committee designed SGO COR over the past 18 months to ensure ease of use and minimal time for data entry—typically 10 to 15 minutes per patient entry—while allowing each institution to examine data and run their own metrics.

“As a group we’ll be able to use all of that data to publish from,” he said. “The data gathered in this is significantly more detailed than what is captured in the National Cancer Data Base—SGO COR has much more information from a surgical and staging standpoint.”

Dr. Grendys added that the medical field has not historically looked at outcomes. “We come up with new treatments, we come up with new surgeries, and we always say, ‘This is better,’ but have we really been able to prove it? I think now we can in a lot of situations,” he said. “Certainly in ovarian cancer we can prove that if your surgery is done by a gyn oncologist and if you follow the guidelines of treatment, you actually live longer, so it’s a much better outcome.”

Download the full SGO COR Participation Guide.

Revised SGO genetics statements approved

The SGO Board of Directors on Oct. 17 approved a clarification on the SGO position on genetic counseling and testing in women with ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal cancer, which was issued in March.

The original wording stated that “women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal cancers should receive genetic counseling and consider genetic testing.” Some have interpreted the phrase “consider genetic testing” to mean that insurers should consider it optional whether they cover genetic testing. SGO supports offering genetic counseling and testing to all women with these cancers; it is then the patient’s decision whether or not to proceed with testing.

The revised Public Position Statement and Clinical Practice Statement now state that “women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal cancers should receive genetic counseling and be offered genetic testing,” regardless of age or family history.

Research grant applications due Nov. 21

The Foundation for Gynecologic Oncology is seeking applications for four research grant awards during the 2015 calendar year. Application deadline is Friday, Nov. 21, 2014.

NCI scientists awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation

On Oct. 3 President Obama announced that two National Cancer Institute (NCI) scientists will receive the National Medal of Technology and Innovation—the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. John T. Schiller, PhD, and Douglas R. Lowy, MD, are both credited with discoveries that enabled the development of HPV vaccines.

According to the NCI website, Drs. Schiller and Lowy, both of the NCI’s Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, led the initial development and characterization of the HPV prophylactic vaccines that ultimately became the recombinant HPV bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines. They currently study basic aspects of the papillomavirus life cycle, second-generation HPV vaccines, and HPV capsid-based vaccines against other infection agents and cancers.

Dr. Lowy, along with several SGO members, collaborated on the NCI’s Report of the Gynecologic Cancers Progress Review Group, published in November 2001. At the 2003 SGO Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer in New Orleans, Dr. Lowy presented the abstract, “Prospects for a prophylactic vaccine against genital HPV infection and cervical cancer,” three years before the quadrivalent vaccine was approved by the FDA.

Dr. Schiller was the lead author of “Current understanding of the mechanism of HPV infection,” published in a June 2010 Gynecologic Oncology supplement on “Mechanism of HPV infection and the implications for the understanding of HPV induced long term protection.”

“As a direct result of Lowy’s and Schiller’s research, vaccines now exist that safely protect against infection with the HPV types that cause most cervical cancers in women and anal and oral cancers in both sexes, as well as HPV types that cause genital warts in both sexes,” the NCI stated.

The National Medal of Technology and Innovation Medal, which will be presented at a White House ceremony later this year, recognizes those who have made lasting contributions to America’s competitiveness and quality of life and helped strengthen the nation’s technological workforce.

Transitioning to ICD-10 National Provider Call Nov. 5

A Medicare Learning Network Connects™ National Provider Call has been scheduled for Nov. 5, from 1:30 to 3 p.m. ET to discuss ICD-10 implementation issues, opportunities for testing, and resources. On Aug. 4, the Department of Health and Human Services issued a rule finalizing Oct. 1, 2015, as the new compliance date for health care providers, health plans, and health care clearinghouses to transition to ICD-10. Earlier this month the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services published the official ICD-10 Guidelines for Coding and Reporting.