SGO Issues Sept 6, 2018

SGO Issues Sept. 6, 2018

SGO endorses ACOG Practice Advisory on cervical cancer screening
Allied Workshop explores application of genomics | Casey Williams, PharmD, BCOP
September is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month: #IWishIKnew
Explore Hawaiian travel packages for SGO Annual Meeting
Call for abstracts deadline Sept. 12 for 2019 SGO Annual Meeting

SGO endorses ACOG Practice Advisory on cervical cancer screening

The SGO and ASCCP have endorsed a Cervical Cancer Screening Practice Advisory released by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) last week. Citing the final recommendation statement on cervical cancer screening in average-risk women published by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) on Aug. 21, 2018, the Practice Advisory affirms ACOG’s current cervical cancer screening guidelines, which encompass all three cervical cancer screening strategies (cervical cytology alone, hrHPV testing alone, and co-testing). The advisory also states “It is appropriate to counsel average-risk women aged 30– 65 years regarding all three strategies so that they can select their preferred option.”

According to the advisory, “The USPSTF recommendations are largely in line with current cervical cancer screening guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG); ASCCP, the American Cancer Society, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology; and interim clinical guidance on hrHPV testing developed by an expert panel that included representatives from the aforementioned groups, the Society of Gynecologic Oncology, the American Society of Cytopathology, and the College of American Pathologists.

“Like the USPSTF recommendations, these expert guidelines recognize that cytology alone, hrHPV testing alone, and co-testing are all effective screening strategies for average-risk women aged 30–65 years. However, expert guidelines recommend that for these women, cotesting with cervical cytology and hrHPV testing every 5 years is preferred; screening with cervical cytology alone every 3 years is acceptable; and hrHPV testing alone can be considered as an alternative screening strategy.”

Allied Workshop explores application of genomics | Casey Williams, PharmD, BCOP

Casey Williams, PharmD, BCOP

Have you ever wondered which patients are more likely to respond to PARP inhibitors? Do you ever feel confused or lost when considering how to best communicate with your patients about the rationale for and cost of genomics? While amazing and unexpected success stories have occurred because of molecularly guided therapy, this seems to be the exception versus the rule. Many factors impact and influence the successful application of genomics in the clinic, and gynecological malignancies present unique challenges compared to most other solid tumors. In the SGO Allied Health Professionals Workshop Sept. 22-23 in Chicago, with a pharmacology preconference session on Sept. 21, we will discuss current controversies around the utilization of genomics in the clinic and describe potential ways to address them.

There are multiple barriers to using molecular information to treat patients with gynecologic malignancies. A major point of contention for many clinicians is the level of evidence needed to determine if the results are actionable. If the data received from the test cannot reliably be used to treat the patient, why order the test in the first place?

During the workshop discussion we will review what actionability means in the context of the current data in ovarian and endometrial cancers and consider strategies to deal with the significant tumor heterogeneity. We will also discuss why the cell of origin matters when reviewing the results from various tests and how it can contribute to appropriate therapy selection.

Additional barriers that will be touched upon include the cost of the test(s), the accession of drugs for off label use, and the use of drugs that are not well studied in combination. Each of these require a level of expertise in a variety of roles.

Although clinicians and researchers are increasingly using molecular testing to guide therapy selection for patients with cancer, a number of hurdles must be overcome before molecular testing becomes routine. Despite the various precision medicine initiatives, a standardized approach to understand and apply the latest and greatest advances in our field is lacking. Moving forward we can hopefully confront these current barriers in order to fully realize the potential of precision medicine in oncology.

Casey Williams, PharmD, BCOP, FHOPA, is Chief Scientific Officer of Experimental Therapeutics at the Avera Cancer Institute and Avera McKennan Hospital & University Health Center in Sioux Falls, SD.

September is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month: #IWishIKnew

Throughout the month of September, both the SGO and the Foundation for Women’s Cancer (FWC) will promote Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month (GCAM) through social media channels and dedicated website content. This year’s social media campaign encourages survivors, patients, medical staff, advocates and friends to post messages about what they want the public to know about gynecologic cancers using the #IWishIKnew hashtag throughout the month. Additional print and video resources for patients are available on both the FWC and SGO websites.

Explore Hawaiian travel packages for SGO Annual Meeting

Programming breaks have been built into the schedule of the SGO Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer on March 16-19, 2018, to allow for family time and sightseeing. Sightseeing tours and activities unique to Oahu and the nearby islands have been recently added to sgo50.org. Reservations will close on Friday, Feb. 28, 2019, at 5:00 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time (6 hours behind Eastern Standard Time). Space is limited so attendees are encouraged to make reservations early.

Call for abstracts deadline Sept. 12 for 2019 SGO Annual Meeting

The deadline for abstract and surgical film submissions for the 2019 SGO Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer® in Honolulu is Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, and the deadline for international submissions is Nov. 12. Accepted science will be announced in November 2018. Late-breaking abstract submissions will be accepted Dec. 5, 2018 to Jan. 7, 2019. The Annual Meeting will be March 16-19, 2019, with preconference sessions on March 15.