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Overview

Learn general information, including risk factors and symptoms, and what to do if your doctor suspects you or your loved one has been diagnosed with uterine cancer. SGO also has a useful toolkit for uterine cancer survivors.

What is Uterine (Endometrial) Cancer?

Uterine cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States, with around 45,000 new cases diagnosed per year. Uterine cancer can be categorized into two major groups: cancers of the uterine lining (or endometrium), called carcinomas, and cancers of the uterine muscle called sarcomas. Sarcomas are rare tumors. They are much less common than cancers that arise in the uterine lining. The information below is for women with the more common endometrial type of cancer.

Endometrial cancer starts in the lining of the uterus. The uterus plays an important role in a woman’s reproductive health, especially during the years when she can become pregnant. It is where a fertilized egg can implant and develop into a baby if she does become pregnant. During a woman’s menstrual cycle, or period, the uterus sheds its lining in the form of bleeding.

What exactly triggers an endometrial cancer is not known, but age, obesity, hormonal disorders, and genetic predisposition are all risk factors. There is no way to screen for endometrial cancer or to completely prevent it. However, many women have symptoms early in the disease process. The most common symptom of endometrial cancer is vaginal bleeding after menopause. Some younger women will have a change in their normal periods. As a result, uterine cancer is detected and treated early in many cases.

Role of the Gynecologic Oncologist

Gynecologic oncologists are trained in the comprehensive management of gynecologic cancer. As such, they coordinate care for women with uterine cancer from diagnosis, to surgery, to chemotherapy, through survivorship and palliative care at the end of life. They serve as captain of the entire cancer care team of medical oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, registered nurses and genetic counselors, among others. Seek a specialist near you.

Patients, Caregivers and Survivors

As part of the overview section on uterine cancer, learn general information, including risk factors and symptoms, and what to do if your doctor suspects you or your loved one has been diagnosed with uterine cancer. SGO also has a useful toolkit for uterine cancer survivors, as well as a video about staying healthy after a uterine (endometrial) cancer diagnosis. Additional resources have been developed to explain gynecologic cancer clinical trials and the phases involved.

NEXT: Risk Factors

Overview

Learn general information, including risk factors and symptoms, and what to do if your doctor suspects you or your loved one has been diagnosed with uterine cancer. SGO also has a useful toolkit for uterine cancer survivors.

This document, developed as an aide to patients, summarizes current scientific data and expert opinions pertaining to uterine cancer. The presented information does not prescribe an exclusive course of treatment and is not exclusionary of other acceptable methods of management including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Treatment modifications typically take into account individual risks and needs as well as resources at particular institutions or regions throughout the world.

 

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Share helpful resources with your patients

The Foundation for Women’s Cancer (FWC), the official foundation of SGO, has produced great resources for your patients and their families in collaboration with SGO members. Visit the FWC website to download, print or order patient-focused educational materials.

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