Uterine Cancer: What happens after treatment?

Uterine Cancer

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What happens after treatment?

Recovery from surgery usually lasts from two to eight weeks, depending on the extent of the surgery and any complications that might occur. Your surgeon might be able to share with you a preliminary pathology report that is done during the surgery. This will give you a general idea of how far the cancer has invaded or spread. The final report usually takes from one to two weeks (sometimes longer), depending on how many biopsies were done. This report is the most accurate one and is used to decide on recommendations for further treatment (radiation or chemotherapy). Sometimes your case will be presented at a conference where the surgeons, radiation doctors, and medical oncologists discuss the best plan for your treatment. Your eligibility for a clinical trial is also discussed.

Once you have completed treatment and there is no evidence of cancer remaining, you will need to have continued visits with your doctor to make sure there is no sign the cancer is returning. How often you will need to be seen will vary depending upon what stage you cancer was and what treatments you received.

Survivorship Toolkit

The SGO Survivorship Toolkit helps survivors organize their treatment history and future care plans. You can develop a survivorship plan along with your gynecologic oncologist and use this as an opportunity to evaluate and improve your overall health.

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