Voices

17  May  17 monica-vetter category Monica Vetter

From Pathology to Positivity | Monica Hagan Vetter, MD

“The aim of Positive Psychology is to catalyze a change in psychology from a preoccupation only with repairing the worst things in life to also building the best qualities in life.”
–Martin Seligman, PhD, founder of the field of Positive Psychology
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19  Apr  17 shannon-maclaughlan category Shannon MacLaughlan

Wellness and cultural change | Shannon MacLaughlan David, MD

The SGO’s 48th Annual Meeting showcased wellness in a multidisciplinary way. A plenary session showed us the impact of burnout on productivity. We learned from a hematologist-oncologist about resilience and career fit. A social worker taught us about managing our energy, and we were reminded by a Navy Seal that medicine is, in fact, a team sport.
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23  Feb  17 brittany-davidson category Brittany Davidson

The Myth of ‘Effortless Perfection’ | Brittany Davidson, MD

I had a healthy fear of GYN/ONC fellowship when I started. My OB/GYN residency wasn’t one I would particularly designate as “onc-heavy” and, while I loved taking care of the oncology patients, I worried whether I would be happy or capable of doing so on a full-time basis. I worried about whether my surgical skills would be up to snuff, whether my attendings would regret ranking me, whether I was emotionally capable to provide these women with the care they needed during one of the most vulnerable times in their lives. What can I say; I worried.
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25  Jan  17 diljeet-singh category Diljeet Singh

Finding time to be balanced about wellness | Diljeet K. Singh, MD, DrPH

When I first learned about the benefits of a wellness approach, my autopilot applied it to my patients and trainees. And when the “practice what you preach” got loud enough in my head, I put it on my to-do list, and whined to myself, “Really? Not only am I supposed to be mindfully treating patients with expertise and compassion, skillfully using the most up-to-date approaches by reading and teaching, thereby curing, etc., but now I need to be Zen about it all?” And to have a healthier “work-life balance,” I need to spend less time doing it?
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01  Dec  16 marta-crispens category Marta Crispens

Continuous performance improvement | Marta Crispens, MD

The patient described here is fictitious, but is based on situations that we have all experienced.

Mrs. Smith is a delightful, 48-year old woman with stage IIIc high grade serous carcinoma of the ovary. She undergoes an optimal cytoreductive surgery, including modified posterior pelvic exenteration with low colon anastomosis. She is slender and healthy. The surgery goes well, except for some challenges with the colon anastomosis. In the end, it is airtight, and all seems well. She is discharged from the hospital quickly, but returns within 24 hours with a pelvic abscess due to a leak from her anastomosis.
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02  Nov  16 leslie-bradford category Leslie Bradford

Running on empty: using exercise to combat burnout | Leslie S. Bradford, MD

I used to be a runner.

For mile after mile, I would maintain a seven-minute mile pace, feeling the stress melting away. Hearing the rhythm of my feet hitting the road cleared my mind and put me in a sort of trance.

You get it. Perhaps you used to be a runner too–or a swimmer, or a cyclist. You were driven. You knew what it meant to feel pain and to keep going. Your sport taught you discipline and resilience. It pushed you to excel in your field.

But life happens.
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06  Oct  16 julian-schink category Julian Schink

Preventing Burnout Through Leadership, Physician Engagement and Patient Engagement | Julian Schink, MD

Early in my career, I had no idea what burnout was, but I certainly knew a lot of burned out doctors. They were disengaged, condescending, mocking patients and learners and referring providers; for a while I thought that was normal, as in “normalized deviance”– the acceptance of something wrong because it is so common. Now physician burnout is in the news, and many specialties report a prevalence as high as 50 percent. While I am not a statistician, that number suggests that either you or one of your partners may be suffering from burnout. With this in mind, I see three steps to decreasing and preventing burnout: Leadership, Physician Engagement, and Reconnecting with Patients.
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08  Sep  16 jeffrey-fowler category Jeffrey Fowler

Hurry, Scurry, Work and Worry | Jeffrey M. Fowler, MD

Maybe I do not have the capacity or wisdom to give any other important mentoring advice to my junior colleagues, but David Cohn, MD, told me that one of the most important words of advice I gave him when he started on faculty at The Ohio State University was, “Just make sure you get a hobby.” Hopefully, I was able to offer more than that in my capacity as his Division Director. Perhaps this was one of the most important pieces of advice young Dr. Cohn received as he was fresh out of fellowship and about to embark on a successful and demanding career in gynecologic oncology.
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10  Aug  16 emily-hill category Emily Hill

Years That Way: Burnout and Gynecologic Oncology | Emily K. Hill, MD

As a resident and fellow, I had tunnel vision. For those eight years, I refused to let myself think in time increments longer than one week. I remember occasionally thinking about the big picture of the years I had left in training and quickly becoming overwhelmed. I’d dial back, to quiet the panic. For many of us, this works for a while.
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11  Jul  16 kimberly-resnick category Kimberly Resnick

The importance of mindfulness | Kimberly Resnick, MD

“… Not being lost in thought, not being distracted, not being overwhelmed by difficult emotions but instead learning how to be in the here and now; how to be mindful, how to be present. I think the present moment is so underrated. It sounds so ordinary and yet we spend so little time in the present moment that it’s anything but ordinary.” Andy Puddicome, TED Talk
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