Voices

10  Sep  14 linda-ryan category Linda Ryan

My Gift of Hope | Linda Ryan

As a three-time cancer survivor, I am more aware of how much meaning my life has now. Not only how precious life is and how thankful I am to be alive, but also of the opportunity to give back.
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26  Jun  14 dee-sparacio-blog category Dee Sparacio

At the Center of it All | Dee Sparacio

Over the past nine years I have seen an increase in the number of non-profit organizations whose mission is to raise awareness of gynecologic cancers and funds for research. There are national organizations and many local gynecologic cancer organizations that consistently raise awareness about the risks and symptoms of gynecologic cancers via TV, radio, print, Twitter and Facebook. Other non-profits fund research host dinners, walks and runs, teas, and auctions. This private funding has been so important the past few years as government funding of cancer research has been reduced.

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17  Apr  14 lauren-prescott category Lauren Prescott

SGO Obesity Toolkit can empower patients | Lauren S. Prescott, MD

In 1997, the World Health Organization formally recognized obesity as a global epidemic. Seventeen years later, we are still facing alarming increases in obesity. As a resident in obstetrics and gynecology and now a fellow in gynecologic oncology, I have struggled to adequately address obesity and weight management with many of my patients.
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20  Mar  14 b-j-rimel category B.J. Rimel

Tweeting at the Meeting | B.J. Rimel, MD

Twitter is an online news and social media feed that uses brief posts (140 characters) to communicate and connect people with information. That little blue bird icon on the side of the news story you are reading or next to the online menu that you just looked up is your direct link to Twitter. The journalist who wrote the story and the chef who made the menu want you to share your thoughts about their content. So does the SGO!
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17  Mar  14 b-j-rimel category B.J. Rimel

First Impressions from the SGO Winter Meeting | B.J. Rimel, MD

Breckenridge, Colorado, was the site of this year’s SGO Winter Meeting on Feb. 20-22. A record-breaking 216 Society members attended despite of (or perhaps because of) the immense amount of fresh snow (over 280% of snowpack). I must confess that this was my first Winter Meeting. Not being a particularly athletic soul, racing downhill at high speed has never had much appeal. That said, I will be back next year. It’s a GREAT meeting.
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06  Mar  14 b-j-rimel category B.J. Rimel

End of GOG Marks a New Beginning | B.J. Rimel, MD

Last month I joined hundreds of gynecologic oncologists in making our yearly pilgrimage to San Diego, CA. For the past four decades, members of our subspecialty would assemble for the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) semi-annual meeting. The GOG has conducted the vast majority clinical trials in gynecologic cancer and the group is responsible for most of the treatment advances in these diseases over the last 45 years. Now, due to major changes in the way that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) funds clinical trials, we are part of a larger group. We have joined up with the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) to create…wait for it…NRG Oncology.
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06  Feb  14 dee-sparacio-blog category Dee Sparacio

Winter Reflections | Dee Sparacio

As I sat at my computer looking out the window at more than seven inches of snow in my yard, I began thinking back to the winters when I was in treatment. I remember how stressed I was that Mother Nature might cause me to miss a treatment. I used to worry that the snow might start during my infusion and I would have to figure out which way to drive home to avoid the steep hill. Thankfully, we only had snow one time on a treatment day, and it wasn’t even deep enough to cause me to change my route driving home. It is easy to enjoy the snow when you don’t have those stresses, but I know women in treatment who do have those stresses, women like those who attend the support group at my cancer center.

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09  Jan  14 erin-stevens category Erin Stevens

Are We Measuring Correctly? | Erin Stevens, MD

Metrics are becoming very important in the treatment of cancer. As physicians, we want to know that all patients are being given the correct treatments for their disease. We can measure this by using databases and codes. Nationwide, we use these metrics as a way to tell us how far we have to go get all patients to receive the standard of care. We also have metrics on end of life care and things we should avoid with our cancer patients, including hospital admissions and chemotherapy in the last two weeks of life. But sometimes numbers do not tell the whole story.
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18  Dec  13 dee-sparacio-blog category Dee Sparacio

Discovering CA-125 | Dee Sparacio

I didn’t even know CA-125 existed until I was diagnosed with Stage 3 ovarian cancer. CA-125 is a “tumor-associated protein” for ovarian cancer. It is found in the blood. Before surgery my CA-125 level was in the high 100’s (below 35 is considered normal). I learned from other women diagnosed with ovarian cancer that their numbers were in the 1000’s when they were initially diagnosed.

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04  Dec  13 kelly-conley category Kelly Conley

The Eternal Fellows | Kelly Conley, AOCNP

While participating in SGO’s Allied Health Workshop this year in Nashville, I realized some common themes among the Advanced Practice Providers. Nashville was illuminating in many ways, from learning what a honky tonk bar entails, to the common bonds of advanced practice providers (APP). I am happy to report we share similar experiences of the good, the bad and the ugly.

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