Voices

20  Nov  13 fredric-price category Fredric Price

The Role of Palliative Care in Gynecologic Oncology | Fredric V. Price, MD

November is National Hospice and Palliative Care Awareness Month

Among the most important advances in our specialty in the last five years has been the recognition of palliative care as an integral part of the practice of gynecologic oncology.

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31  Oct  13 b-j-rimel category B.J. Rimel

Negotiating the pelvic exam | B.J. Rimel, MD

Lately, I’ve been hearing a great deal of negotiating in my office. Now that I’ve been in practice for two years, I’m getting to see some patients back for surveillance visits and unfortunately some for recurrence. Regardless of the reason for the visit the strategy is always the same: is there a way to avoid the pelvic exam portion of the visit? In an attempt to discuss the reasons why we, as gynecologic oncologists, perform what is inevitably an uncomfortable examination, I will answer the top 5 things said in my office after I say, “I’m going to step out now so you can undress.”
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18  Sep  13 dee-sparacio-blog category Dee Sparacio

It Takes a Community to Establish a Tweet Chat | Dee Sparacio

In January, I wrote a blog post on this site about my aspirations for the year. So far in 2013, I haven’t painted very often nor have I consistently exercised. But with the help of the gynecologic cancer community my aspiration to be part of a tweet chat has happened.

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05  Sep  13 geraldine-jacobson category Geraldine Jacobson

HVO team treats cancer patients in Paraguay | Geraldine Jacobson, MD, MPH, MBA

“SGO is looking for a volunteer radiation oncologist to travel with Health Volunteers Overseas (HVO) to Paraguay”

I read this e-mail with my morning coffee and within hours had volunteered. I have been interested for several years in the challenges of providing radiation oncology services (capital and resource intensive) in middle- and low-resource countries, and considered this to be a unique opportunity.

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08  Aug  13 b-j-rimel category B.J. Rimel

Travel Shots | B.J. Rimel, MD

My daughter loves to travel. She loves getting on an international flight and watching the flight staff go through their checklist. She is always the only one listening with rapt attention as the flight attendants describe the safety features of the jet and she will frequently pull out the safety card from the seat back pocket to review the exits and point out which one we should use. She loves getting off the plane in some new locale and trying the local food, especially the sweets. But she hates shots.
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25  Jul  13 erin-stevens category Erin Stevens

Saying Thanks | Erin Stevens, MD

The time comes every June and July when the graduating fellows leave and the new fellows start their subspecialty training. Graduation is not something unfamiliar at this point in our careers. We’ve done high school, college, medical school, and residency graduation in the preceding 16 or so years of our lives. We’re old hat at graduating. But outside of the pomp and circumstance that surrounds our departure from training, it is also a time to say thank you and good-bye.
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27  Jun  13 erin-stevens category Erin Stevens

Of Mice and Men: The Language of Medicine | Erin Stevens, MD

My third year of fellowship is my research year. Whereas I long to go back to the clinical service and talk to patients, my current patients are mice. My mice are housed on the ninth floor of the basic science building in the Department of Laboratory Animal Research, or DLAR. Over two months ago, I gave a small cohort of them ovarian cancer. I go every day to weigh them and see if they’re growing tumors. So far, it has worked in about half of them – suffice it to say I’m definitely better cut out for the clinical side of gynecologic oncology. Due to construction, the direct elevators to the DLAR have been out of service for months. You either have to take the stairs up nine flights or cut through the construction site. I usually choose the latter.
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