Voices

11  Jan  13 erin-stevens category Erin Stevens

A Letter to My Patients: Promises Part 1 | Erin Stevens, MD

This is Part 1 of an excerpt of a speech I gave at the Stony Brook University Hospital’s Gynecologic Oncology Candlelight Ceremony in September 2012.

Sure, I’m only a fellow.  But what that means to me is that I am part of the future of the field of gynecologic oncology.  I was one of the 43 people that was chosen my year to be a gyn onc fellow.  I have hopes and dreams for what my career will be like.  But mostly, what I have now are some promises.

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Voices

02  Jan  13 b-j-rimel category B.J. Rimel

New Year’s Resolutions | B.J. Rimel, MD

This New Year, 2013, marks the year of the snake, the Jewish year 5773-5774 and my second year in practice.  Gynecologic oncology is a career that thrills me with the promise of exciting days in the OR.  Performing surgery is one of the most fulfilling things we get to do in our practice and it is often the start of the long relationship we have with our patients. Our cases tend to be complex, even when the pathology is benign, leading to long operative times and missed evening plans.

Time in clinic is also rewarding; seeing patients who are doing well is one of my favorite activities.  However, when patients are struggling it can be exhausting.  Frequently, there is too much to say and too little time.  This leaves me with a sense of unfinished business that tugs at my conscience in the early hours of the morning.  Sleep is already a luxury destroyed by my 10 month old who keeps strictly New York hours in my Los Angeles home.

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Voices

24  Dec  12 dee-sparacio-blog category Dee Sparacio

Celebrating the holidays after a cancer diagnosis: A survivor’s guide | Dee Sparacio

Celebrating the holidays after a diagnosis of cancer can be a challenge. We survivors expect to do things just as we had in the past even though we may be recovering from surgery or going through difficult chemotherapy or radiation treatments.

In 2005 I was in chemotherapy treatment but I still wanted to make those five different types of Christmas cookies, to make ornaments, to decorate the tree, to put up the outside lights, to attend all the holiday parties and to host Christmas dinner. I didn’t want to disappoint my family and I certainly didn’t want cancer to ruin our holiday. But I was so tired I wasn’t sure I could do all I had planned. I was stressing out.

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Voices

28  Nov  12 dee-sparacio-blog category Dee Sparacio

Every cancer patient has a story to tell | Dee Sparacio

On July 29, 2005, I woke up to hear my gynecologic oncologist say, “You have stage three ovarian cancer.” Hearing those words was difficult and ushered in my life as a cancer survivor.

A few months earlier I had seen my gynecologist about a dull pain I was having on the left side of my abdomen. Since my sister had been diagnosed with breast cancer, I was vigilant about getting an annual physical and mammogram. After two ultrasounds, an MRI and a visit to the emergency room I was referred to the gynecologic oncologists at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick. I underwent a hysterectomy, oophorectomy and had my oomentum removed during debulking surgery.
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